Category: Interviews

Press/Video: Drew for ‘Glamour UK’ Magazine

In a refreshingly honest interview, Drew Barrymore opens up to GLAMOUR about feminism, ageing naturally and her amazing beauty brand, Flower Beauty.

Drew Barrymore, the woman who stole my heart aged seven, as I sat on my dad’s knee in the cinema watching E.T., walks into her hotel room and gives me a big hug. She’s wearing a green silk Zara kimono jacket and a vintage Mickey Mouse T-shirt. I am slightly taken aback by her normality. Seeing an icon in the flesh, one whom I’ve girl-crushed on since childhood, is surreal. She should, given her Hollywood pedigree, be giving Mariah a run for her money in the diva stakes.

But there are no demands, no entourage. And no sanitised, PRd-to-within-an-inch-of-their-lives soundbites. She’s in the UK to promote her beauty brand, Flower Beauty. In fact, five minutes in, and we’re talking heroin and plastic surgery.

“I have an extremely addictive personality,” says Drew, openly. “I’ve never done heroin,” she comments, referring to her misspent youth, “and I don’t want to get plastic surgery because I feel like they’re both very slippery slopes. I feel if I try either, I’m going to be dead really soon.”

It’s why she feels very strongly about ageing naturally. “Not messing with my face or chasing some unnatural beauty is a standard I live by. I have dark circles under my eyes. I was at my dermatologist’s recently who said to me, ‘Can I shoot some Juvederm up there? It will raise the skin and it won’t be so sunken, which is causing the darkness to look worse, because it’s lower than the natural light that is hitting it.’ And I went: ‘No, but I’m gonna go home and start highlighting under my eyes, so thank you for the tip!”

It’s this refreshing, no-BS approach that has led to her to becoming a genuine, modern role model, appealing to women of all ages. Often, when actresses say they don’t have plastic surgery, what they really mean is they don’t go ‘under the knife’ – but that excludes injectables. I look more closely at Drew’s face and I can assure you it’s as real as her attitude. Her under-eyes and forehead have the natural fine lines you’d expect of a 43-year-old mother of two. Everything moves and she is beautiful. It’s unusual for a Hollywood star of her status to be so, well, au natural.

“It shouldn’t be,” she says, shaking her head. “We’ve gone far too far with the whole thing, especially when people who are so young are doing it.” She’s always felt this way, more so now she’s a mother.
“I feel ageing is a privilege. It’s about how to do it gracefully, with humour, self-love and a respect for the process, and that’s always been really important to me. Then I started having girls and I thought, thank god these were my initial instincts. Now I can carry them out in an even more deep and profound way.”

Instead of surgery, she swears by a ‘Clear + Brilliant’ laser treatment with NYC-based dermatologist Dr Roy G. Geronemus.

“He’s the best,” she assures me. “[The treatment] just schluffs the barnacles of brown and sun damage off your face. It’s the greatest thing ever. It’s non-invasive and there’s no downtime. It’s like microdermabrasion laser, but it always makes me feel so much more attractive.”

If she sounds like the most balanced person you’ve ever met, by her own admission, it hasn’t always been that way. Born in Los Angeles into an acting dynasty on her father’s side, she was put to work in a dog food commercial aged 11 months. She was a film star by seven – pouring Baileys over her ice-cream – and her mother reportedly first took her clubbing to Studio 54 when she was nine. Sadly, around the same time, Drew developed a drink and drug habit.

Professionally, she was judged harshly, with no big roles coming her way. But she never gave up, rising from the ashes to become a successful, Golden Globe- and SAG-award-winning actress and producer, star of Never Been Kissed, 50 First Dates, The Wedding Singer, Scream, Charlie’s Angels Grey Gardens and more recently Netflix show, Santa Clarita Diet. On a personal level, motherhood seems to have given her a sense of belonging – she is a single mum to her two girls Olive, six and Frankie, four, from her third marriage to Will Kopelman, which ended in 2016.

Now, she has another string to her bow: beauty boss – in 2013 she launched her cruelty free cosmetics brand Flower Beauty, which is now available in the UK. It closes the gap between mass and prestige and everything is priced under £13. What inspired her to go down the ethical route?
“I was vegan and an animal-rights activist a lot of my life, so I think it’s just held over from that. I used to be a crazy fundamentalist and didn’t wear leather. So for my own brand, I had to be true to my ethics. People sometimes assume we’re a major botanical, organic company because we’re called Flower Beauty and I’m like, oh no – bring on the chemicals. I want good pigments and amazing products that perform.” Is there a product in her collection she swears by? “Our concealer wand is phenomenal,” she smiles.

In the wake of #MeToo, when activism and speaking out has become the norm, does she still identify herself as an activist? After all, she took her daughter Olive to the anti-Trump Women’s March in 2017.

“I was a bit scared of feminism when I was younger because of all the male bashing. And there are a lot of women’s movements now that I’m apprehensive about, because I don’t want to be viscerally angry at men. I love men. I like keeping both sides in mind. I avoid anything political, where I sense too much anger. It’s just not the way I find messaging to be truly empowering.”

So what hopes does she have for her daughters in the future? “The empowerment to know that girls and women are worthy without wanting to take down the male race…”

As we wrap up the interview, I can’t help but think Drew’s eldest daughter is now almost the same age as she was when I first set eyes on her in E.T. – and how she’s creating a happy, stable childhood for her daughters, so different from her own. If she could send a message to her angry, scared seven-year-old self now, what would it say?
“I would try to tell her how everything’s going to be OK ­– but she just won’t know it till she’s there anyway.”
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Press/Video: Watch Norm Macdonald sit down with Drew Barrymore, Michael Keaton, and more on new Netflix show

Norm Macdonald’s new Netflix talk show is finally set to make its debut and the streaming service has unveiled a profanity-filled first look at the series.

In the preview for Norm Macdonald Has a Show the comedian sits down with a long list of stars, including Drew Barrymore, David Letterman, Jane Fonda, David Spade, Chevy Chase, M. Night Shyamalan, Michael Keaton, and Lorne Michaels.

Along with his sidekick Adam Eget, the Saturday Night Live alum asks such probing questions as “Do you miss cocaine?” to Barrymore and “Have you been thinking about your mortality a lot lately?” to Letterman. In between talking strip clubs with Judge Judy and Chase quipping that he “f—ed” Bob Dylan, there are plenty of clumsy on-set mishaps to enjoy.

First announced in March, series is based on his podcast/web series Norm Macdonald Live and is set to debut on Sept. 14.
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Drew on the Cover of the February 2018 Issue of InStyle

DREW BARRYMORE has spent 43 years charging forward. We asked her to go back to where she started.

One advantage Drew Barrymore has from living in the heart of the cultural consciousness for the past 35 years is that she has primo #TBT material. “When I was 6, my mom dressed me like a little 80-year-old woman,” Barrymore says, holding a stack of inspiration images on the set of her InStyle cover shoot. She lands on one from 1983 where she’s in a miniature black evening gown and pearls. “When I first unearthed this photo, I was like, ‘Are you kidding me? That’s my daughter Olive’s body 100 percent!’ ”

But it wasn’t only the trickle-down genetics and era-specific fashion that resonated. “None of those pictures were taken at home,” she says a few days later, sitting in the den of her Upper East Side apartment in N.Y.C. “Not like people would necessarily have pictures of me at home, but it’s almost like I never was at home. I was always out and about. That was the biggest takeaway for me.” She pauses and smiles. “And it’s funny because you’d have to take a crowbar and a spatula and a forklift to get me out of the house now.”

Barrymore’s apartment is equal measures Drew and her two daughters, Olive (5) and Frankie (3). Sandra Boynton books are stacked on Rizzoli monographs; Dr. Seuss mingles with Joan Didion. It’s cozy and personal—and has a super-impressive craft closet. It’s easy to see why the trio who inhabit the space would never want to leave. Tonight the family has just finished decorating two Christmas trees to a holiday playlist of Elvis Presley, Mariah Carey, and Bing Crosby classics. Miracle on 34th Street is on TV, soundless, in the background.

At 43, Barrymore is still finding room to explore. Outside of acting, which she still loves (her Netflix show, Santa Clarita Diet, returns for a second season this year), and producing (her company, Flower Films, has both TV shows and films in the works), the star also boasts Barry­more Wines by Carmel Road, the cosmetics line Flower Beauty, and Dear Drew, a clothing collection launched this fall with Amazon Fashion.

“I kept feeling this burning desire to build an apparel brand for women by women, to explore something romantic,” she says. “I took it back to my love of tailoring and having been in a costume house my whole life.” The cuts and silhouettes match Barrymore’s personal aesthetic. “I have a body type that I tend to cover up,” she says. “So it’s nothing tight, not big and boxy, more of a fluid drape that feels like the ’20s, ’40s, and ’70s. Not utterly casual but efforted in its effortlessness.

“I’m very conscious about the way people feel,” Barrymore says of how she looks at her growing empire. “When I was making movies, I just didn’t want to tell a depressing story; I wanted to tell one about some type of self-improvement. I thought, ‘There’s enough shit in life. I want optimism and joy.’ At the same time, I don’t like magic-wand happy endings—and now I don’t like magic-wand makeup or magic-wand clothes.”

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Marie Claire – April 2016 | Drew’s the Boss

Drew Barrymore runs a whole lot more than a stellar career in Hollywood. She’s at the helm of a burgeoning beauty empire, a production company, a wine business, and a bestselling memoir. Welcome to her next act.

Drew and I both like to say we won the sister-in-law jackpot. From the night my brother, Willie Kopelman, introduced us at a quiet dinner in Santa Monica, California, in 2011, we were add-water-N-stir insta-pals. Our wine-fueled cackles have taken us late into the night, and we’ve made breakfast for our kids with eye bags at 6 a.m. And at any time in between hours of coffee and cocktails, she is a pure joy—no prima-donna horsesh*t, no entourages, no vanity.

With last fall’s memoir, Wildflower, Barrymore has cemented herself as not just an award-winning actress, but also an accomplished writer. Not to mention entrepreneur: Her production company, Flower Films, has made more than $1 billion at the box office and released the recent How to Be Single; her makeup and eyewear line, Flower, is launching an e-commerce site this year and may expand abroad; and sommeliers across the country have added Barrymore Wines to their lists. We plopped on her bedroom carpet while our kids watched The Little Mermaid downstairs, and got to it.

On fame and celebrity friendship: “I’ve never felt comfortable with this, sort of, camaraderie of famous people. I’ve known Poo Poo [Cameron Diaz] since I was 14 years old. We just happened to know each other before her career started, and I was working in a coffeehouse trying to refigure out my life. So in a weird way, it doesn’t even count with us.”

On making an effort: “I went to parent’s night, and I wore some lipstick and concealer, and I thought the people at school looked at me kind of differently. I normally come with acne, and Ugg boots, and I thought they were like, ‘Oh that’s nice, she made a little bit of an effort.'”

On trying to do it all: “I really had to tell myself, You can do everything, but you will have to do them at different moments. And you can do a lot in the same moment, but you can’t do everything in the same moment. It was a good lesson that you will just have to prioritize and put some things over here for a little while.”

On being self-taught: “It was prompted a little bit by a fear of I don’t want to end up being 25 and not having ever educated myself in any way.”

On self-promotion: “I try really hard to keep my Instagram personal and sweet, and use it in a way to engage with people so that I can talk about work stuff, but [self promotion] is so not who I am.”

Read the full interview and see more pics in the April issue of Marie Claire, on newsstands March 22.

Drew Barrymore: Firestarter

Drew is featured on the cover of the March issue of Harpers Bazaar magazine. The feature has her talking about her time in Hollywood from the early 1980’s until now.

After three decades in the spotlight, the actress and producer—and now beauty magnate—keeps stoking the flame.​

Drew Barrymore is remembering her Firestarter face, the expression she’d make when she was about to set things ablaze in the 1984 Stephen King classic. “I always said, ‘Back off. Back off. Just back off, and don’t make me angry.’ Then I would clench my fists and scrunch my face a little bit and breathe rapidly, focus my eyes on something, and then blow it up.” She adds wryly, “And although I’m such a peacekeeping hippie, I wish I had that power every once in a while. I totally wish I could blow some stuff up with my eyes.”

After her 36 years in the public eye—her story is so storied, it doesn’t bear repeating—Barrymore’s power is assured. While she characterizes her “heat” these days as more of a “simmer,” she’s happy to walk down a fiery memory lane. One may recall a picture of a baby Barrymore, in a puff-sleeved party frock, lighting King’s cigarette at the film’s premiere. “People were like, ‘Oh, that would be funny.’ I don’t even know if he was a smoker or not.” Pause. “Somehow when you have a young girl, things are sort of excused. … But I think it’s even cooler now. It’s such an awesome picture.”

During filming, “Stephen would come around. And I got to be in his office, that famous attic he writes in that’s on the cover of his book On Writing. It was just a very cool time, and not in Hollywood.”

Barrymore is also having a very cool time not in Hollywood. The mother of two young daughters—Olive, three, and Frankie, almost two—with her husband, art consultant Will Kopelman, she lives on two coasts, in Los Angeles and on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. She divides her time between raising her girls and blossoming her nascent businesses, Flower Beauty and Barrymore Wines. Flower, originally a film-production company, is now an empire that has grown with the 2013 launch of makeup and, most recently, eyewear.

“I don’t think I’m hot right now necessarily, because I have all my irons in a bunch of different fires,” Barrymore says, amused at the heavy-handedness of the metaphor. “I’m writing. I’m doing makeup. I’m doing design. I’m expanding Flower into different categories.” She adds, “I think it’s a huge mistake to think you have to burn bright for your whole life. You cannot sustain it. It’s exhausting, and it’s not very realistic.”

Barrymore, 41, describes her typical day thus: “Well, I have one of two days. One is really with my kids. Wake up, breakfast, activities, naps, activities, bath, and bed. Same as every parent—trying to make life fun for them, exhaust them, love them, feed them, be affectionate, be silly, and just be present. And drink a lot of caffeine.” (Tejava iced tea, by the way, extra large, which, after years of knowing Barrymore, I am yet to see her without.) “Another day could be in a lab or on a plane for a two-day jaunt on a business trip.” Like this cover shoot, for which we hurtled to Paris on a red-eye, then went straight to set. (Here, champagne was the new tea.) “My days are rarely mixed together,” she says. “I probably subconsciously do that so I can maximize my time with my kids.”

Barrymore has experienced Hollywood heat in all its iterations. “It’s been at different intervals: E.T. was a really exciting time; when I was doing The Wedding Singer and starting Flower Films; making Never Been Kissed and Charlie’s Angels; when I directed Whip It and did Grey Gardens in the same year. Those were times when I really pushed myself and I didn’t care about my sleep, my health. I didn’t have relationships or children that would be a priority over my work.”

Today, of course, that time is in the rearview mirror. “Hot is a state of mind,” she reflects. “It’s an energy. You’re hot when you’re motivated. It means you want it and you’re going after it.” For Barrymore, “hot isn’t about being on the A-list or having a hot body. It’s literally people who are on fire. Like Lena Dunham is on fire. Amy Schumer. Louis C.K. I think their brands of comedy and observational life stuff are some of the coolest I’ve seen in so many years.”

These days, Barrymore is more of a viewer than a participant in the movie business. “If I was obsessed with the world of film the way I used to be—and may one day be again—I would love to remake Firestarter. It’s such a cool concept. Ooh, and with the special effects now, you could do so much! It would be emotional and interesting because it’d all be together in this little girl.” Like Olive and Frankie? Wouldn’t they just be too adorable, lighting Stephen King’s cigarettes at parties? Barrymore lets out a dry-humored sigh. “Um, no.”

“I Feel Like I Was Born the Day My Kids Were”

Drew Barrymore’s wild child days are long gone, but being a mom is way more fun anyway!

“I just love having a family,” the 40-year-old mother of two told E! News exclusively at the launch of her curated holiday collection for Shutterfly. “I love my kids—I feel so blessed. I feel like I’ve never been better as a person [than I am] through my family.”

Drew and husband Will Kopelman are the proud parents of two little girls: Olive, 3, and Frankie, 19 months. The actress, entrepreneur and DIY mama realizes she’s lucky to have a fantastic extended family, too, telling E! News, “I love my in-laws. It’s like I’m defying the clichés because we’re all so close.”

That’s not to say, though, that life is always picture-perfect for this settled-down gal. Drew recently opened up about her struggle with postpartum depression. “I wasn’t really trying to sort of over-open myself up to anything, but I was just being honest about what my own little journey was,” she told E! News exclusively. “The outpour[ing] of women coming up to me and relating was really extraordinary.”

Motherhood “is en emotional roller coaster,” Drew explained. “You just care so much about how to be the best mom, the perfect mom—even though there’s no such thing as perfection, you expect that of yourself.”

Of course, any hardships that come with being a parent are well worth it for Drew. “Being a mom is everything in the world,” she said. “I feel like I was born the day my kids were, and everything in life was like an experiment to learn to apply to them.”

Drew opens up a lot more about the highs and lows of motherhood, marriage and what she’s getting Olive and Frankie for the holidays in the video above.

(Source)

This Morning Interview

The Daily Mail gives us a clip of Drew’s appearance on This Morning from Monday!

Drew Barrymore talked about her troublesome childhood in an interview with This Morning on Monday.
The 40-year-old was on the show to promote her memoirs, Wildflower, and told hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby that she burned out at a young age.
She said: ‘I had a mid-life crisis at 25. I write about it in a chapter, called Outward Bound, which was fitting when you start work at 11 months old.

‘At 14, I got emancipated. I walked out of the courts an adult.

‘I had to go and find my first apartment and that chapter was so fun for me to write because I didn’t know you had to throw take-out cartons in the trash.’
She added: ‘Laundry saved my life. I didn’t understand it. I poured the bleach directly on the jeans and they looked like disintegrated dalmatians.

‘I was like, am I going to crumble and wear disintegrated jeans or figure this out. I’m a master of laundry.’

Drew had a troubled past and famously had her first drink at nine years of age, began smoking pot at 10, and took cocaine at 12, but she says becoming a mother has brought her contentment.
Married to Will Kopelman, 38, they are parents to Olive, three and Frankie, one.

‘I put pressure on myself with everything,’ she said. ‘But the stakes are higher when it comes to children.

‘I have two girls, which is an amazing thing. I have to raise great women.’

Phillip said: ‘Now it seems as though you have everything together.’

But Drew, who looked lovely in a brown kaftan dress and statement necklace, giggled and said: ‘If I have fooled you to think that, then I have done something so right. It’s such a compliment.

‘As a mother, you always wonder how you can do things better. You just want to do everything perfectly for your kids.

‘I couldn’t be happier or more grateful for where my life is at. It’s like a cartoon behind the scenes, of how to keep it all in place.’

Drew Barrymore, Toni Collette tear up talking ‘Miss You Already’

Go ahead and grab a hanky now — and hang onto it!

If 1988’s “Beaches” brought a tear to your eye, get ready for a new female friendship flick that’s sure to get the waterworks going again.

Drew Barrymore and Toni Collette stopped by TODAY Wednesday to talk about their film “Miss You Already,” which focuses on their on-screen BFF bond and how a serious illness for one impacts them both.

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