Category: Press

Press/Video: Drew for ‘Glamour UK’ Magazine

In a refreshingly honest interview, Drew Barrymore opens up to GLAMOUR about feminism, ageing naturally and her amazing beauty brand, Flower Beauty.

Drew Barrymore, the woman who stole my heart aged seven, as I sat on my dad’s knee in the cinema watching E.T., walks into her hotel room and gives me a big hug. She’s wearing a green silk Zara kimono jacket and a vintage Mickey Mouse T-shirt. I am slightly taken aback by her normality. Seeing an icon in the flesh, one whom I’ve girl-crushed on since childhood, is surreal. She should, given her Hollywood pedigree, be giving Mariah a run for her money in the diva stakes.

But there are no demands, no entourage. And no sanitised, PRd-to-within-an-inch-of-their-lives soundbites. She’s in the UK to promote her beauty brand, Flower Beauty. In fact, five minutes in, and we’re talking heroin and plastic surgery.

“I have an extremely addictive personality,” says Drew, openly. “I’ve never done heroin,” she comments, referring to her misspent youth, “and I don’t want to get plastic surgery because I feel like they’re both very slippery slopes. I feel if I try either, I’m going to be dead really soon.”

It’s why she feels very strongly about ageing naturally. “Not messing with my face or chasing some unnatural beauty is a standard I live by. I have dark circles under my eyes. I was at my dermatologist’s recently who said to me, ‘Can I shoot some Juvederm up there? It will raise the skin and it won’t be so sunken, which is causing the darkness to look worse, because it’s lower than the natural light that is hitting it.’ And I went: ‘No, but I’m gonna go home and start highlighting under my eyes, so thank you for the tip!”

It’s this refreshing, no-BS approach that has led to her to becoming a genuine, modern role model, appealing to women of all ages. Often, when actresses say they don’t have plastic surgery, what they really mean is they don’t go ‘under the knife’ – but that excludes injectables. I look more closely at Drew’s face and I can assure you it’s as real as her attitude. Her under-eyes and forehead have the natural fine lines you’d expect of a 43-year-old mother of two. Everything moves and she is beautiful. It’s unusual for a Hollywood star of her status to be so, well, au natural.

“It shouldn’t be,” she says, shaking her head. “We’ve gone far too far with the whole thing, especially when people who are so young are doing it.” She’s always felt this way, more so now she’s a mother.
“I feel ageing is a privilege. It’s about how to do it gracefully, with humour, self-love and a respect for the process, and that’s always been really important to me. Then I started having girls and I thought, thank god these were my initial instincts. Now I can carry them out in an even more deep and profound way.”

Instead of surgery, she swears by a ‘Clear + Brilliant’ laser treatment with NYC-based dermatologist Dr Roy G. Geronemus.

“He’s the best,” she assures me. “[The treatment] just schluffs the barnacles of brown and sun damage off your face. It’s the greatest thing ever. It’s non-invasive and there’s no downtime. It’s like microdermabrasion laser, but it always makes me feel so much more attractive.”

If she sounds like the most balanced person you’ve ever met, by her own admission, it hasn’t always been that way. Born in Los Angeles into an acting dynasty on her father’s side, she was put to work in a dog food commercial aged 11 months. She was a film star by seven – pouring Baileys over her ice-cream – and her mother reportedly first took her clubbing to Studio 54 when she was nine. Sadly, around the same time, Drew developed a drink and drug habit.

Professionally, she was judged harshly, with no big roles coming her way. But she never gave up, rising from the ashes to become a successful, Golden Globe- and SAG-award-winning actress and producer, star of Never Been Kissed, 50 First Dates, The Wedding Singer, Scream, Charlie’s Angels Grey Gardens and more recently Netflix show, Santa Clarita Diet. On a personal level, motherhood seems to have given her a sense of belonging – she is a single mum to her two girls Olive, six and Frankie, four, from her third marriage to Will Kopelman, which ended in 2016.

Now, she has another string to her bow: beauty boss – in 2013 she launched her cruelty free cosmetics brand Flower Beauty, which is now available in the UK. It closes the gap between mass and prestige and everything is priced under £13. What inspired her to go down the ethical route?
“I was vegan and an animal-rights activist a lot of my life, so I think it’s just held over from that. I used to be a crazy fundamentalist and didn’t wear leather. So for my own brand, I had to be true to my ethics. People sometimes assume we’re a major botanical, organic company because we’re called Flower Beauty and I’m like, oh no – bring on the chemicals. I want good pigments and amazing products that perform.” Is there a product in her collection she swears by? “Our concealer wand is phenomenal,” she smiles.

In the wake of #MeToo, when activism and speaking out has become the norm, does she still identify herself as an activist? After all, she took her daughter Olive to the anti-Trump Women’s March in 2017.

“I was a bit scared of feminism when I was younger because of all the male bashing. And there are a lot of women’s movements now that I’m apprehensive about, because I don’t want to be viscerally angry at men. I love men. I like keeping both sides in mind. I avoid anything political, where I sense too much anger. It’s just not the way I find messaging to be truly empowering.”

So what hopes does she have for her daughters in the future? “The empowerment to know that girls and women are worthy without wanting to take down the male race…”

As we wrap up the interview, I can’t help but think Drew’s eldest daughter is now almost the same age as she was when I first set eyes on her in E.T. – and how she’s creating a happy, stable childhood for her daughters, so different from her own. If she could send a message to her angry, scared seven-year-old self now, what would it say?
“I would try to tell her how everything’s going to be OK ­– but she just won’t know it till she’s there anyway.”
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Press/Video: The Story Behind Scream’s 12-Minute, Still-Terrifying Opening Scare

Kevin Williamson was a struggling actor in his 20s when he decided to try his hand writing the sort of slasher films he grew up loving. By then, he’d watched Halloween and Friday the 13th so many times that he knew every twist of the camera and jump scare by heart. “I wanted to write a horror movie that I’d want to watch,” he said. “But how do you scare an audience when all the magic tricks have been exposed?”

The answer, as it turned out, was Scream, the self-aware, meta horror ’90s hit about a group of teenagers who have watched all the horror movies, and then, one by one, are murdered. More than 20 years later, Scream is still scary. And everything that makes it great is on display in its electric opening scene: a twisted game of horror trivia, a beautiful girl, a pair of gruesome murders, a telephone ringing in an isolated house at night.

For Vulture’s package on the 100 Scares That Shaped Horror, Williamson shared the story behind how he conceived of the film’s iconic opening scene.

I knew all these horror movies inside and out, and I kept thinking: How do you scare an audience that grew up on VHS, that’s watched these movies over and over again? So I thought, we comment on the rules and then subvert them a bit — or, sometimes, we follow them exactly, and then you never know what you’re going to get. When you put your star actress in the opening scene and kill her, you’re putting everyone off their game.

I wanted the Janet Leigh moment. I always felt that once you killed the star of the movie, all bets are off. When we first did the movie, Drew was attached to play Sidney Prescott, and then we were trying to find a bigger actress to play the opening part. At the time, Alicia Silverstone was huge, coming off of Clueless, but then Drew told us, “I really just want to play the opening scene. That’s my favorite part of the movie.” And that was great by us.

I wanted her to be the classic, ingénue teenage girl, with that innocent face, in a white sweater and blond hair. At the time, Drew had jet black hair, and she’d just dyed it, so we couldn’t dye it back to blond. She had to wear a wig. I remember Wes saying, “let’s just think of her as a Catholic school girl. She does everything right, and she’s a perfect little girl, and she’s about to be eviscerated, and that’s it.” And I was like, “okay, works for me!” I just wanted the audience to relate to her on some emotional level, and that’s why casting was so important. You meet her and two minutes later she’s in danger. We need an instant connection.

That’s what Drew brought to it. You instantly related to her and the fear dancing in her eyes as she starts to get nervous and uncomfortable, and she starts to realize this is going south. It’s a great performance. Her body language in the beginning is very swirly and rhythmic. She pulls a knife out and slides it back in to the butcher block. She spins around. And then the minute she gets scared, her shoulders go inward and everything changes. If you watch it again, just watch her body language as it transforms.

Drew was very adamant that she didn’t want to see the man playing the voice. We had him in a separate tent, and we had to keep him away from Drew’s vision. She just wanted to hear the voice and be scared by the voice. She didn’t want to attach a face to it. She didn’t want to get one word wrong. And I’m talking even about her screams and her breaths and her “No! No! No!” She was on the mark. I was blown away by her rhythm. I’m always happy to have actors ad-lib, because that can be some of your best stuff and Matthew Lillard was a genius at it. But she was so careful.

A big inspiration for me was the opening scene of When a Stranger Calls with Carol Kane. It was one of those relentless scenes with mood and atmosphere and a slow build. In my first pass of the scene, Casey Becker was actually babysitting. Once I’d written it, I realized it wasn’t necessary. Really, the scene was about Casey’s boyfriend, who was outside strapped to a chair. And it was about the game, and the premise, and the setup, and the conceit of the world we’d created. I wanted it to be just long enough that the audience thinks she might survive it. And the only way to do that was to let it go on just a tad longer than it should. An opening scene shouldn’t go on longer than ten minutes, and this one went on much longer than that.

Once I latched onto the game, I do remember I had written way too many questions. Eventually I narrowed it down, and focused in on the trick question [“Name the killer in Friday the 13th.”] I had much harder questions in the beginning, and the scene really went on forever.

From the page to the screen, we changed some things based on the house and the location. Like, how she got out of the house, and when she looked up at the window and saw that he was staring down at her. All of those moments were created on the spot because of the house. We wanted a house with windows everywhere. Wes was always big on shooting on location. He always wanted to see out the windows, so that the audience could see the danger, or not see the danger that was lurking out there. Prior to the shooting, I went with him to the house and we walked it, and I went and rewrote the action scenes based on his blocking. It was my first experience of realizing that what I saw in my head was never what it actually is. That was a big learning experience, of learning how to let things go. But this is the process. It’s a group effort. It was mostly, “oh wow, this is not what I envisioned in my head — this is better.”

It took them five nights to shoot it. It was my first movie, and I had no idea what I was doing. I was just standing there, asking constant questions. Like, “what’s that? That’s a crane!” I remember the producer looking at me at one point and saying, “you might want to stop asking questions. He’s not here for you. This isn’t a study session.” And Wes was like, “no it’s cool, it’s cool.” I found Wes to be the most calming presence on the set. He saved all his dark impulses for the work. He was just this quiet captain. He always had a great connection with the actors because he was so quiet and intimate with them.

Watching the scene come to life was very emotional. I called my mom and dad on the phone and let them hear Wes screaming “cut!” It was a big deal. It was the beginning of my career. And you just never know how it’s going to play out — it was such a question mark. How lucky was I that my first movie would be something like that? Scream was just everything and more to me. And it still is.
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Press: RuPaul, Drew Barrymore, Faith Hill and James Corden to judge new talent competition

RuPaul, Drew Barrymore, Faith Hill and James Corden are set to headline The World’s Best, a global talent competition.

The 10-episode series comes from reality TV veterans Mark Burnett (Warner Horizon Unscripted & Alternative Television) and Mike Darnell (MGM Television), who are best known for their involvement in The Voice and American Idol.

Set to premiere in 2019, the series will feature acts from every genre as they attempt to break through the “wall of the world”. Not only will they have to impress the judging panel, but they’ll have to win over 50 of the world’s most accomplished entertainment experts.

Sharon Vuong – CBS’ SVP, Alternative Programming for CBS – said: “It’s only fitting that The World’s Best perform in front of the world’s best. James, Drew, Faith and RuPaul are all amazing talents who have excelled in their respective fields on a global scale. We can’t wait for them to bring their distinct voices to a show that’s unlike any other.”

“We feel incredibly lucky that James Corden agreed to be part of this groundbreaking global event competition,” commented Darnell. He’s an absolute force of nature, and his versatility, passion and showmanship are unrivaled.

“The very name of the show defined the caliber of judges we sought out and ultimately got. Drew, RuPaul and Faith are incredibly accomplished superstars whose talents encompass every area of entertainment. Along with James, The World’s Best will now be the gold standard of competition shows.”

Burnett also said: “James Corden is at the top of his game and there is no one better to host this ultimate international competition series. This groundbreaking series is like the Olympics of talent shows and needed the perfect talent combination.”
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Press: Drew Barrymore’s New Fragrance Line Is Designed to Last All Day

Blame it on body chemistry, but fragrances—no matter how high-end—never seem to linger on me longer than an hour. If I really go crazy spritzing in the morning, I might get lucky and still catch a faint whiff around lunchtime. But sadly, I’ve never been one of those lucky, fragrance-friendly people who gets to spend the whole day enveloped in a cloud of scent. (I know, I know—cue a chorus of tiny violins.)

Leave it to Drew Barrymore to create the anecdote. The latest from her line, Flower Beauty, is a six-part fragrance collection called “Pretty Deadly.” It’s comprised of three spicy floral scents, all of which are rendered in both eau de parfum and body mist form. And here’s the magic part: I find that if double-up on a single fragrance by spraying on the body mist version post-shower, then applying the eau de parfum as normal, the scent lasts for the whole day. Yep, really.

Of course, you can also wear them each alone or mix-and-match perfumes and mists to create a unique combo. But if, like me, you need a little extra insurance, layering two forms of the same scent is a total game-changer.
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Press/Video: Watch Norm Macdonald sit down with Drew Barrymore, Michael Keaton, and more on new Netflix show

Norm Macdonald’s new Netflix talk show is finally set to make its debut and the streaming service has unveiled a profanity-filled first look at the series.

In the preview for Norm Macdonald Has a Show the comedian sits down with a long list of stars, including Drew Barrymore, David Letterman, Jane Fonda, David Spade, Chevy Chase, M. Night Shyamalan, Michael Keaton, and Lorne Michaels.

Along with his sidekick Adam Eget, the Saturday Night Live alum asks such probing questions as “Do you miss cocaine?” to Barrymore and “Have you been thinking about your mortality a lot lately?” to Letterman. In between talking strip clubs with Judge Judy and Chase quipping that he “f—ed” Bob Dylan, there are plenty of clumsy on-set mishaps to enjoy.

First announced in March, series is based on his podcast/web series Norm Macdonald Live and is set to debut on Sept. 14.
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In Conversation | Drew Barrymore and Robert Osborne on Classic Movies

Drew did an interview for the New York Time Magazine where she talks with Robert Osborne. The two talk about movies and Drew shares how she does not feel she is a good actor.

As far as on-screen duos go, Robert Osborne and Drew Barrymore seem like an unlikely pair. He was raised in the small town of Colfax, Wash. (population 2,800) during the ’40s and amused himself with reading books while his parents worked. She grew up amidst the glitz and glamour of Hollywood in the ’80s, the youngest in a long family line of legendary actors, and made her first television appearance before she was even a year old. But they share an almost obsessive love for movies, particularly black-and-white films made decades ago. It’s this connection that makes Osborne and Barrymore light up together as the host and co-host, respectively, of TCM’s “The Essentials.” The show, which premiered in 2001 and airs on Saturday nights, puts timeless, classic films in the spotlight with commentary and fun bits of trivia supplied by the hosts (in the past those duties have been taken up by everyone from Rob Reiner to Alec Baldwin). This season marks Barrymore’s third as Osborne’s wingwoman, and the two clearly enjoy the back-and-forth banter — as well as the goofy handshakes, thumb wars and screwball comedy moments that often happen after the cameras stop rolling. T caught up with the actors on set to talk about the films that forever changed them, the characters they’ve admired and crushed on, and what’s missing from the box office today.

Q.
You both have a love for movies from the past; where does this come from?

A.
OSBORNE: Well, my love of movies started when I was 7 years old, living in a small town, going to the movies all the time, and finding the people in the movies more interesting than the people in my small town. Also at that time, it wasn’t that easy to find out about movies. So when I had a curiosity, it sent me into research about the people in the movies or the movies being made. The more I found out about movies, the more interesting they were to me.

BARRYMORE: I just started working when I was 11 months old. So I enjoyed, like, getting to know the medium in which I was working but I so much more got obsessed with the stories that filmmaking told …

OSBORNE: But that’s part of your blood, that’s part of your DNA. I don’t have family that was anywhere near show business.

BARRYMORE: Well, that was also my way of getting to know them. If you want to learn about your grandfather, watch “Twentieth Century,” “Dinner at Eight,” “Grand Hotel” — all movies that we’ve done on “The Essentials.” And yeah, I mean, films were not only what I work in, but you’re absolutely right, it was a way to get to know my relatives.

What films shaped you the most?

OSBORNE: I was shaped by the heroes in the films I saw, which you always want to emulate and be like. I wanted to be like Alan Ladd, Gary Cooper, Jimmy Stewart. I think one of the things that’s missing from films today are real heroes for you to emulate. Our heroes have become, you know, antiheroes more than heroes. But I would say, if any film affected me a lot, it would be “A Place in the Sun,” because when I saw that, I was like 17 or 18, and I so understood Montgomery Clift’s dilemma of liking Shelly Winters because she was kind to him, and he was lonely and he felt out of place. And then when he had a chance to be with Elizabeth Taylor, you know, I can understand his dilemma of wanting to not be with Shelly Winters anymore. And just the angst he suffered; I was at an age when I enjoyed suffering angst. It had a huge effect on me.

BARRYMORE: I have a longer list: “Pollyanna,” “Captains Courageous,” “Black Stallion,” “Foxes,” um, “Excalibur”? I was, like, obsessed with “Camelot” and “Excalibur” and “Anne of a Thousand Days” — any double-VHS-giant double-beta set of those films. I just loved the swashbuckling nature of them, I was obsessed. I loved watching men in cinema, and I liked watching young girls, whether it was a Jodie Foster in “Foxes” or a Hayley Mills in “Pollyanna.” It could be squeaky clean and it could be super like L.A.- streets-gritty, but there was no barrier between. I liked older men and younger girls. That was what I responded to in film.

You lived through those characters a little, right?

BARRYMORE: I wanted Richard Burton and Spencer Tracy, and I wanted Jodie Foster and Hayley Mills.

What movie just blew your mind?

OSBORNE: I remember one that had a deep effect on me. I don’t know if it blew my mind, but I remember when I was a kid and saw “Meet Me in St. Louis” for the first time…

BARRYMORE: Ding, ding went the trolley!

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Drew Covers Marie Claire as The Rebel Next Door

Drew is on the cover of the new issue of Marie Claire. Such a great article … Drew talks about her love of cooking, motherhood & family, and her new photography book. Plus we get to hear from her friend and partner Nancy Juvonen.

“I found the porn section!” Drew Barrymore is shouting through the narrow aisles of Book Soup in West Hollywood. An older woman perched behind the counter narrows her eyes, watching while Barrymore longingly strokes the spines of several hardback books, none of which contain anything saucier than, well, sauce.

“I looooove cookbooks,” Barrymore, 38, exclaims. “I cook a lot when I’m pregnant.” The actress-producer-entrepreneur and, with her recent photography volume Find It in Everything, author has a 16-month-old daughter, Olive, with art consultant husband Will Kopelman and is due with their second daughter in March. “When I got pregnant the first time, I couldn’t even boil water.” By logging long hours on food channels and poring over recipes, she taught herself to cook. “Now I can make the most spectacular slow-roasted pork tacos you will ever have, an incredible verde sauce with ancho chilies—so fucking good.” Barrymore eagerly scrolls through her iPhone for her latest triumph: “A Greek yogurt pie with lemon zest and pepper filling on a gingersnap crust with black seedless grape compote,” plated on vintage china, a hand-embroidered napkin folded off to one side. “Amazing!” she beams.
The same could be said of Barrymore’s transformation from the fast-and-loose genial wild child who trumpeted her bisexuality and flashed her breasts at David Letterman when he turned 48 (there are worse birthday gifts) into an organic-omelet-whisking, cabbage-rose-gardening, modern-Martha wife and mother. Gone is the “love of love” that for decades magnetized her to dubious dudes (Tom Green, Fabrizio Moretti, Justin Long) and kept her in a sudsy romantic churn. Instead, a cozier, cultivated domesticity has her house-hunting and school-screening in New York City to nest closer to her in-laws, Coco and Arie Kopelman, the former head of Chanel. This is New Barrymore, or, as her sister-in-law and writer Jill Kargman labels her, “Jew Barrymore.”

“I try to be a good shiksa wife,” explains Barrymore. “I go to Central Synagogue in New York.” She also attempted to prepare a Passover Seder when she and her husband were courting. “It was a disaster. I screwed everything up. And I got the date wrong. I ended up taking him to a really awesome Seder at [Working Title president and producer] Liza Chasin’s house.”

Casual friends for several years, Kopelman and Barrymore reconnected in January 2011. A year after their first date, they were engaged. Six months after that, they were married. “Sometimes whom you least expect is the person you fall for,” Kopelman, 36, says. “It was a combination of moments: watching her with my nephew. Traveling with her. Going to museums with her. I knew, adding them up, this was it.” He laughs when recalling her reaction to him not seeing key films in her oeuvre. “She was angry and surprised I hadn’t seen Grey Gardens or Ever After and immediately sat me down and had me watch them.”

Kargman says Barrymore reminds her of their mother, who would pull exquisitely roasted lamb from the oven while wearing ballgowns: “That combination of glamour and homeyness is so Drew!” The familial comparison brings tears to Barrymore’s eyes. Over lunch at the decidedly old-fashioned joint The Musso & Frank Grill—a favorite of her grandfather John Barrymore, whose Hollywood star sits outside the entrance—she confesses, “I don’t know anybody in my family of origin. The other day someone asked me what my mother’s mother’s name was, and I was like, ‘No idea.'” In the dim light, Barrymore resembles her famous kin, with a gently sloping face and the bow lips of a 1930s screen gem. She says she feels of a different time, and though dressed in a white quilted “$19 Princess Leia–looking tunic from Topshop” and jeans, Barrymore rhapsodizes about pouring herself into a gown and teasing her hair into a giant beehive.

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