Photos: 2015 Red Carpet Appearances and Public Events
Filed in Images Press Public Appearances Screencaps and Stills

Photos: 2015 Red Carpet Appearances and Public Events + Talk Show Stills

I’ve sorted through more of Drew’s older red carpet appearances and added over 3,000 high quality photos from all of her appearances from 2015 as well as 2015 talk show stills. I have many more photos to sort through so keep checking back. Enjoy!

Press/Photos: Drew for ‘New Beauty’ Magazine (Spring Issue) + 2019 Photo Sessions
Filed in Flower Beauty Images Magazines Photoshoots Press

Press/Photos: Drew for ‘New Beauty’ Magazine (Spring Issue) + 2019 Photo Sessions

Drew Barrymore Tells Us Her Go-To Derm Treatment, Favorite Skincare Products and the One Item All Women Need

The walls in Drew Barrymore’s NYC bathroom are covered with the happiest kind of art: family photos, plus drawings and love notes from her two daughters. And every square inch of the white-tiled countertop is covered with the happiest kind of chaos: hundreds of balms, creams, serums, and Flower Beauty lab samples, organized with military precision. Five minutes ago, the actor/producer/author/entrepreneur shot a short, sweet and spontaneous how-to video with her new mesmerizing Flower eye pigments. Yesterday, she put in a 17-hour day on the set of The Stand-In, a rom-com in which she plays dual roles: Candy, a discontented movie star, and her eager stand-in Paula. The production will wrap just as Santa Clarita Diet returns to Netflix for its third season this spring. But right now, at this moment, Barrymore has only thing on her mind: excavating a 10-gallon Ziploc bag of sheet masks from the top of her linen-turned-beauty closet.

NewBeauty: I’ve never seen so many sheet masks outside of a K-beauty boutique. How did you get so many?
Drew Barrymore: I made them! I discovered JayJun on my first research trip to Hong Kong for Flower Beauty. I had popped into a drugstore in a subway station underneath a weird mall and grabbed their Baby Pure Shining sheet mask. I tried it and was instantly impressed. Two days later in South Korea, I had already arranged a meeting with the company, and we collaborated to launch three masks [JayJun x Drew Barrymore] in Asia.

NB: When you’re in a foreign drugstore, jet-lagged and you don’t speak the language, how do you shop smart?
DB: It’s almost like going into a wine shop. You’ll see a product on the shelf and something about the label speaks to you, or maybe you’re in the mood for that varietal. If you’re in the mood for a sheet mask, that’s what you’ll focus on. I’m not crazy about trying tons of color cosmetics—you can get those anywhere. For me, it’s all about the skin-care formulas—what’s that latest innovation you don’t have access to because it’s all the way on the other side of the world.

NB: Congrats on winning a NewBeauty award for your lip duo! What inspired it?
DB: What made me fall in love with lipstick was this mid-’80s double-ended lipstick pencil from Shiseido. Both ends had the same shade, but one side was a buttery finish and the other was completely matte. If you love a shade, how brilliant to have it in two different formulas! And then later I would look at someone like J.Lo on TV and wonder why her lips could so prismatically capture the light. So I created a two-in-one, my Flower Mix N’ Matte Lip Duo ($10), with one very wearable color on one side and an illuminating lip gloss in the same tone on the other. It won’t change the shade at all, but will pick up the light. Actually, it’s three-in-one: this end, that end, and the two ends together!

NB: Have you always been a beauty obsessive?
DB: I grew up in a makeup trailer, so I knew what makeup was. All of it. But they don’t really do much makeup on kids. They put you in a chair and put a puff on your nose and make you feel a part of it. While we were making Firestarter, they would spray a lot of sticky, wet, viscous glycerin on my face to look like sweat. I was covered in fake blood before anyone ever put lipstick on me! And then in real life, at night, I was going out with a lot of adults who were certainly wearing makeup. There’s nothing like early ’80s rouge! Boy George and Adam Ant were the thing. At 10, I was at dance clubs wearing eye shadow in a straight line out to my temples. I was really into chartreuse and gold, glittery-fine sparkle, like olive-green snakeskin. I’ve always felt that getting ready for a date is the best part of an evening: It doesn’t even matter if the date isn’t great, you get to take a moment and be feminine. Put on some music and dance while you get ready and do your makeup. I was filming all day yesterday in prosthetics and color contacts, looking at all the glues and adhesives, and fake noses and eye bags, and eyebrow additives. I’m into the theatrics, the art, all the crazy stuff you can do to transform your face, age yourself, change your hair, look like a different person. When I would work with Kevyn Aucoin, he was really into that. He loved making women into other women. He made me into Myrna Loy.

NB:What other tricks have you learned on set?
DB: They used to re-powder women all day long, and after 15 hours of hot lights baking it into your skin, the makeup looked so cakey. High-definition stopped people from piling it on, and everyone got inspired by the rice-paper sheets. It became more about blotting and lifting up the oil rather than trying to matte it with more and more powder. Then there was this perfect storm where makeup in general just got a whole lot lighter. Everything became about tinted moisturizer, instead of heavy base makeup. And color correctors! Which was Ben Nye’s approach: he made up all the glamorous women in film in the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s, and then created his own line 50 years ago. His kids run it today. I love that legacy. Sometimes I like to think my girls will be involved in Flower Beauty one day. Olive would be a chemist and Frankie would come up with all the marketing.

NB:When did you start taking skin care seriously?
DB: When I was a teen, I washed my face with a bar of clear vitamin E soap. Nothing. Moisturizers always broke me out. They still do on my chin. My chin is like a completely different neighborhood on my face, and you don’t go there after dark. Any product that goes on my chin will screw it up. In my late 30s, I started taking my skin seriously. I like scrubs and all of that stuff, and acids and tingling, but I’m still a firm believer in the most gentle face washes. I always want to have a lot of moisturizer and serum, and that’s why I love the new Flower Beauty skin elixir ($16). The goal was to create a formula that makes your skin look like you’ve just left a workout class: pinky, plumped and dewy—like when you have your own body’s blush on your cheeks. My dear friend stole it from me recently, which is a sign she truly likes it. She called it a wake-up for your face and makeup. I love the freshest, dewiest face. I have a phobia of clogged-looking skin. It goes back to watching women’s skin get baked under hot lights.

NB:You’ve tested thousands of products: what’s the one every woman should buy?
DB: At one point in your life, you will need lip liner. That’s what I’ll tell my girls. You won’t think you’ll ever need it, and then one day you’ll see that lip liner isn’t just for fun. It’s a necessity.

NB: Beyond sheet masks, do you have any go-to skin fixes?
DB: I love the Clear + Brilliant laser. I do it once a year to slough away my sunspots. I also try to get a facial once a year, but I just don’t have the time to go more frequently. I’m obsessed with Augustinus Bader’s rich cream ($265) and Shani Darden’s Retinol Reform ($95)—it has a little tingle when you put it on. Dr. Dan’s CortiBalm ($7) is really good for hydrating dry lips. And my Clinique acne gel ($27). I just spot it on any arriving friend from out of town in the form of a zit and say, ‘Go back to where you came from!’”

NB: Do you have any healthy habits you swear by for feeling good?
DB: Just behaving. Being as nice as I can. Not being a total A-hole. Just being in a good mood at work, not losing my cool when my kids lose their cool. Not sweating the small stuff. I’ve realized that even when the little things aggravate you and seem really big and monumental, or even very public within your own circle and you just wish you could hide your problems, you just can’t lose your cool. Be nice through all of it. That’s always when I feel the best, no matter what. Go put it out in some private corner and then show up and just be good to everyone.

NB: Has becoming a mother changed your ideas about beauty?
DB: I do feel like I’m on an upswing. I just went through a couple of hard years, and I can see it wearing on my face. It’s not about aging, it’s about how I am on the inside. There’s also a very long period when you’re raising kids when it takes it out of you. When it depletes your ability to take care of yourself because your new job is doing nothing but taking care of someone else and you love it. I’m not all about working from the inside out—I’m not big on meditation—but I do think your outside cannot hide your inside. I’m now determined more than ever to show my daughters that aging is a luxury. If we’re lucky, we are all going to age. I just want them to be at peace with who they are and not what they look like. If they are good, cool people, that’s all I care about. That said, I feel like people— myself included—have a 2019 new-battery recharge. I’m one of many who are coming out of a semi-difficult hibernation. Like in the spring. And hope springs eternal!

NB: Do you have any advice for women out there who need to recharge their batteries?
DB: Would it be cheating if I said to face mask?
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Filed in 50 First Dates Films Press

Press: 50 First Dates wasn’t originally set in Hawaii — and had a completely different ending

It’s been 15 years since Adam Sandler tried to make an amnesia-stricken Drew Barrymore fall in love with him daily on an idyllic Hawaiian island in 50 First Dates. The film marked the second of the unofficial Barrymore-Sandler trilogy that began with 1998’s The Wedding Singer and concluded, at least for now, with 2014’s Blended. But it’s also an unexpected rom-com, given the very traumatic nature of the ailment suffered by Barrymore’s Lucy after a car crash leaves her waking up every morning with no memories of anything that happened to her after her accident. Sandler’s Henry, a notorious commitment-phobe, finds himself drawn to Lucy and making her fall in love with him from scratch every day.

In honor of the anniversary and as part of EW’s romantic-comedy-themed Untold Stories issue, director Peter Segal revealed some original script details that could have changed the story completely.

50 First Dates… in Seattle?
“Originally, the story was written to take place in Seattle, and when we decided to change it to Hawaii, it took on a whole new personality, and now I can’t imagine movie not having been filmed there because the island and the people became very unique characters and an innate part of the film that was never originally planned. [Seattle] would have completely changed the tone. One of the things I’ve been very proud of is that the soundtrack for the movie won a gold record, and it was very specifically ’80s covers that were done with an island vibe, and obviously we couldn’t have done that in Seattle.”

50 First Dates… in a Cafe?
“The original script, most of it all took place in the cafe, and one of the first things I did when I came on board was, I said, ‘We really have to open up the movie because it feels very claustrophobic. We’ve got to get out of here, right now this is playing like My Dinner with Andre over and over again.’ Once I encouraged Adam to open up the movie and the script to write new scenes in the Kualoa Ranch, then came all the ideas of tying him up and using the penguin as a decoy, and Drew saving Adam with the baseball bat, kicking Rob Schneider’s ass. All those were a result of that, and they became some of the more memorable, hilarious scenes in the movie that were not there originally when it took place all in the cafe. It was fun to open that up.”

50 First… Kisses?
“50 First Kisses was actually the original title of 50 First Dates, but marketing found that the term ‘kisses’ was turning off guys, so they changed it to 50 First Dates.”

An Alternate Ending?
“This ending is very different from the original script version, which had Lucy waking up in bed and immediately looking at a mural on the ceiling that tells the story of her accident and life since. As her eyes pan from left to right, she turns to see Henry lying next to her in bed, and in this version, they didn’t have children. It was a mural that she painted that, unlike the mural in her father’s garage, which they painted over each day so she had a blank canvas to work on, this one Henry left up so that when she woke up in the morning she could see a pictorial timeline of her last day to reintroduce her. So by the time she finished panning with her eyes from left to right, she would come to rest on Henry, and unlike earlier in the movie when she woke up in bed with him and he was a stranger again and she screamed and had a reaction, it was a way of reintroducing her to her life again. And we thought that was fine, but it wasn’t until the idea came up of completing Henry’s journey and seeing him fulfill his dream of studying walruses in their natural habitat, the idea came up, well, what if Lucy, her father, and their child were all there with him, and that just seemed really exciting and very emotional to me. The hardest thing in movies is come up with a strong beginning and a strong end, and if you have that, you’ve got a shot, and I think to this day, it’s the best ending to any movie that I’ve done.”

A Cure for Lucy?
“The studio debated, should Lucy be cured and it be a happy ending? And I’m so glad everyone supported this bittersweet ending because that’s what was so heartbreaking about it, that she has to re-experience this every day. And it’s so amazing what Henry does for her every day. It breaks your heart for both characters, what one has to go through and the other has to endure, and I think that’s part of the charm and heartbreak of it.”
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Filed in Films Press The Stand-In

Press: Drew Barrymore Movie To Film Scenes In Lexington

The one and only Drew Barrymore is coming to the Bluegrass to film scenes for the movie “The Stand-In.”

The film is set to feature the commonwealth. Wrigley Media Group CEO Jayne Hancock says that the movie is “another fantastic Drew Barrymore romantic comedy.”

Around four to six scenes of the comedy will be filmed in the Bluegrass at the end of the month.

“It is quite an achievement and it’s all connections and that’s what we’ve been doing here,” said Wrigley Media Group President Misdee Wrigley Miller.

“The film is a romantic comedy in which Drew Barrymore plays an actress who is washed up and burnt out and she decides to swap with her stand-in to live a different life,” said Wrigley Media Group Executive Producer Ross Babbit. “My sister Jamie and I have been working in entertainment for a lot of years. I’ve done a lot work for HGTV, DIY Network and Travel Channel — numerous unscripted networks and she’s been on the scripted side all these years. So the idea of being able to work together on a project here in Lexington, has been awesome.”

Shooting locations are schedule to feature downtown Lexington, including the Courthouse, and downtown Versailles.

“I think people in Lexington will be excited to see the final movie, because they will recognize their town and everything that’s great about it,” said Babbit. “When you have the star power of a Drew Barrymore coming to town and validating that this is a place to shoot, encourages others to look at us and think of Lexington and greater commonwealth is attractive for filmmakers and TV-makers.”

Wrigley Media Group is asking for extras in Kentucky. You can apply here.
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Filed in Interviews Press Videos

Press/Video: Drew for ‘Glamour UK’ Magazine

In a refreshingly honest interview, Drew Barrymore opens up to GLAMOUR about feminism, ageing naturally and her amazing beauty brand, Flower Beauty.

Drew Barrymore, the woman who stole my heart aged seven, as I sat on my dad’s knee in the cinema watching E.T., walks into her hotel room and gives me a big hug. She’s wearing a green silk Zara kimono jacket and a vintage Mickey Mouse T-shirt. I am slightly taken aback by her normality. Seeing an icon in the flesh, one whom I’ve girl-crushed on since childhood, is surreal. She should, given her Hollywood pedigree, be giving Mariah a run for her money in the diva stakes.

But there are no demands, no entourage. And no sanitised, PRd-to-within-an-inch-of-their-lives soundbites. She’s in the UK to promote her beauty brand, Flower Beauty. In fact, five minutes in, and we’re talking heroin and plastic surgery.

“I have an extremely addictive personality,” says Drew, openly. “I’ve never done heroin,” she comments, referring to her misspent youth, “and I don’t want to get plastic surgery because I feel like they’re both very slippery slopes. I feel if I try either, I’m going to be dead really soon.”

It’s why she feels very strongly about ageing naturally. “Not messing with my face or chasing some unnatural beauty is a standard I live by. I have dark circles under my eyes. I was at my dermatologist’s recently who said to me, ‘Can I shoot some Juvederm up there? It will raise the skin and it won’t be so sunken, which is causing the darkness to look worse, because it’s lower than the natural light that is hitting it.’ And I went: ‘No, but I’m gonna go home and start highlighting under my eyes, so thank you for the tip!”

It’s this refreshing, no-BS approach that has led to her to becoming a genuine, modern role model, appealing to women of all ages. Often, when actresses say they don’t have plastic surgery, what they really mean is they don’t go ‘under the knife’ – but that excludes injectables. I look more closely at Drew’s face and I can assure you it’s as real as her attitude. Her under-eyes and forehead have the natural fine lines you’d expect of a 43-year-old mother of two. Everything moves and she is beautiful. It’s unusual for a Hollywood star of her status to be so, well, au natural.

“It shouldn’t be,” she says, shaking her head. “We’ve gone far too far with the whole thing, especially when people who are so young are doing it.” She’s always felt this way, more so now she’s a mother.
“I feel ageing is a privilege. It’s about how to do it gracefully, with humour, self-love and a respect for the process, and that’s always been really important to me. Then I started having girls and I thought, thank god these were my initial instincts. Now I can carry them out in an even more deep and profound way.”

Instead of surgery, she swears by a ‘Clear + Brilliant’ laser treatment with NYC-based dermatologist Dr Roy G. Geronemus.

“He’s the best,” she assures me. “[The treatment] just schluffs the barnacles of brown and sun damage off your face. It’s the greatest thing ever. It’s non-invasive and there’s no downtime. It’s like microdermabrasion laser, but it always makes me feel so much more attractive.”

If she sounds like the most balanced person you’ve ever met, by her own admission, it hasn’t always been that way. Born in Los Angeles into an acting dynasty on her father’s side, she was put to work in a dog food commercial aged 11 months. She was a film star by seven – pouring Baileys over her ice-cream – and her mother reportedly first took her clubbing to Studio 54 when she was nine. Sadly, around the same time, Drew developed a drink and drug habit.

Professionally, she was judged harshly, with no big roles coming her way. But she never gave up, rising from the ashes to become a successful, Golden Globe- and SAG-award-winning actress and producer, star of Never Been Kissed, 50 First Dates, The Wedding Singer, Scream, Charlie’s Angels Grey Gardens and more recently Netflix show, Santa Clarita Diet. On a personal level, motherhood seems to have given her a sense of belonging – she is a single mum to her two girls Olive, six and Frankie, four, from her third marriage to Will Kopelman, which ended in 2016.

Now, she has another string to her bow: beauty boss – in 2013 she launched her cruelty free cosmetics brand Flower Beauty, which is now available in the UK. It closes the gap between mass and prestige and everything is priced under £13. What inspired her to go down the ethical route?
“I was vegan and an animal-rights activist a lot of my life, so I think it’s just held over from that. I used to be a crazy fundamentalist and didn’t wear leather. So for my own brand, I had to be true to my ethics. People sometimes assume we’re a major botanical, organic company because we’re called Flower Beauty and I’m like, oh no – bring on the chemicals. I want good pigments and amazing products that perform.” Is there a product in her collection she swears by? “Our concealer wand is phenomenal,” she smiles.

In the wake of #MeToo, when activism and speaking out has become the norm, does she still identify herself as an activist? After all, she took her daughter Olive to the anti-Trump Women’s March in 2017.

“I was a bit scared of feminism when I was younger because of all the male bashing. And there are a lot of women’s movements now that I’m apprehensive about, because I don’t want to be viscerally angry at men. I love men. I like keeping both sides in mind. I avoid anything political, where I sense too much anger. It’s just not the way I find messaging to be truly empowering.”

So what hopes does she have for her daughters in the future? “The empowerment to know that girls and women are worthy without wanting to take down the male race…”

As we wrap up the interview, I can’t help but think Drew’s eldest daughter is now almost the same age as she was when I first set eyes on her in E.T. – and how she’s creating a happy, stable childhood for her daughters, so different from her own. If she could send a message to her angry, scared seven-year-old self now, what would it say?
“I would try to tell her how everything’s going to be OK ­– but she just won’t know it till she’s there anyway.”
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Filed in Career Films Press Scream Videos

Press/Video: The Story Behind Scream’s 12-Minute, Still-Terrifying Opening Scare

Kevin Williamson was a struggling actor in his 20s when he decided to try his hand writing the sort of slasher films he grew up loving. By then, he’d watched Halloween and Friday the 13th so many times that he knew every twist of the camera and jump scare by heart. “I wanted to write a horror movie that I’d want to watch,” he said. “But how do you scare an audience when all the magic tricks have been exposed?”

The answer, as it turned out, was Scream, the self-aware, meta horror ’90s hit about a group of teenagers who have watched all the horror movies, and then, one by one, are murdered. More than 20 years later, Scream is still scary. And everything that makes it great is on display in its electric opening scene: a twisted game of horror trivia, a beautiful girl, a pair of gruesome murders, a telephone ringing in an isolated house at night.

For Vulture’s package on the 100 Scares That Shaped Horror, Williamson shared the story behind how he conceived of the film’s iconic opening scene.

I knew all these horror movies inside and out, and I kept thinking: How do you scare an audience that grew up on VHS, that’s watched these movies over and over again? So I thought, we comment on the rules and then subvert them a bit — or, sometimes, we follow them exactly, and then you never know what you’re going to get. When you put your star actress in the opening scene and kill her, you’re putting everyone off their game.

I wanted the Janet Leigh moment. I always felt that once you killed the star of the movie, all bets are off. When we first did the movie, Drew was attached to play Sidney Prescott, and then we were trying to find a bigger actress to play the opening part. At the time, Alicia Silverstone was huge, coming off of Clueless, but then Drew told us, “I really just want to play the opening scene. That’s my favorite part of the movie.” And that was great by us.

I wanted her to be the classic, ingénue teenage girl, with that innocent face, in a white sweater and blond hair. At the time, Drew had jet black hair, and she’d just dyed it, so we couldn’t dye it back to blond. She had to wear a wig. I remember Wes saying, “let’s just think of her as a Catholic school girl. She does everything right, and she’s a perfect little girl, and she’s about to be eviscerated, and that’s it.” And I was like, “okay, works for me!” I just wanted the audience to relate to her on some emotional level, and that’s why casting was so important. You meet her and two minutes later she’s in danger. We need an instant connection.

That’s what Drew brought to it. You instantly related to her and the fear dancing in her eyes as she starts to get nervous and uncomfortable, and she starts to realize this is going south. It’s a great performance. Her body language in the beginning is very swirly and rhythmic. She pulls a knife out and slides it back in to the butcher block. She spins around. And then the minute she gets scared, her shoulders go inward and everything changes. If you watch it again, just watch her body language as it transforms.

Drew was very adamant that she didn’t want to see the man playing the voice. We had him in a separate tent, and we had to keep him away from Drew’s vision. She just wanted to hear the voice and be scared by the voice. She didn’t want to attach a face to it. She didn’t want to get one word wrong. And I’m talking even about her screams and her breaths and her “No! No! No!” She was on the mark. I was blown away by her rhythm. I’m always happy to have actors ad-lib, because that can be some of your best stuff and Matthew Lillard was a genius at it. But she was so careful.

A big inspiration for me was the opening scene of When a Stranger Calls with Carol Kane. It was one of those relentless scenes with mood and atmosphere and a slow build. In my first pass of the scene, Casey Becker was actually babysitting. Once I’d written it, I realized it wasn’t necessary. Really, the scene was about Casey’s boyfriend, who was outside strapped to a chair. And it was about the game, and the premise, and the setup, and the conceit of the world we’d created. I wanted it to be just long enough that the audience thinks she might survive it. And the only way to do that was to let it go on just a tad longer than it should. An opening scene shouldn’t go on longer than ten minutes, and this one went on much longer than that.

Once I latched onto the game, I do remember I had written way too many questions. Eventually I narrowed it down, and focused in on the trick question [“Name the killer in Friday the 13th.”] I had much harder questions in the beginning, and the scene really went on forever.

From the page to the screen, we changed some things based on the house and the location. Like, how she got out of the house, and when she looked up at the window and saw that he was staring down at her. All of those moments were created on the spot because of the house. We wanted a house with windows everywhere. Wes was always big on shooting on location. He always wanted to see out the windows, so that the audience could see the danger, or not see the danger that was lurking out there. Prior to the shooting, I went with him to the house and we walked it, and I went and rewrote the action scenes based on his blocking. It was my first experience of realizing that what I saw in my head was never what it actually is. That was a big learning experience, of learning how to let things go. But this is the process. It’s a group effort. It was mostly, “oh wow, this is not what I envisioned in my head — this is better.”

It took them five nights to shoot it. It was my first movie, and I had no idea what I was doing. I was just standing there, asking constant questions. Like, “what’s that? That’s a crane!” I remember the producer looking at me at one point and saying, “you might want to stop asking questions. He’s not here for you. This isn’t a study session.” And Wes was like, “no it’s cool, it’s cool.” I found Wes to be the most calming presence on the set. He saved all his dark impulses for the work. He was just this quiet captain. He always had a great connection with the actors because he was so quiet and intimate with them.

Watching the scene come to life was very emotional. I called my mom and dad on the phone and let them hear Wes screaming “cut!” It was a big deal. It was the beginning of my career. And you just never know how it’s going to play out — it was such a question mark. How lucky was I that my first movie would be something like that? Scream was just everything and more to me. And it still is.
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Filed in Career News Press The World's Best

Press: RuPaul, Drew Barrymore, Faith Hill and James Corden to judge new talent competition

RuPaul, Drew Barrymore, Faith Hill and James Corden are set to headline The World’s Best, a global talent competition.

The 10-episode series comes from reality TV veterans Mark Burnett (Warner Horizon Unscripted & Alternative Television) and Mike Darnell (MGM Television), who are best known for their involvement in The Voice and American Idol.

Set to premiere in 2019, the series will feature acts from every genre as they attempt to break through the “wall of the world”. Not only will they have to impress the judging panel, but they’ll have to win over 50 of the world’s most accomplished entertainment experts.

Sharon Vuong – CBS’ SVP, Alternative Programming for CBS – said: “It’s only fitting that The World’s Best perform in front of the world’s best. James, Drew, Faith and RuPaul are all amazing talents who have excelled in their respective fields on a global scale. We can’t wait for them to bring their distinct voices to a show that’s unlike any other.”

“We feel incredibly lucky that James Corden agreed to be part of this groundbreaking global event competition,” commented Darnell. He’s an absolute force of nature, and his versatility, passion and showmanship are unrivaled.

“The very name of the show defined the caliber of judges we sought out and ultimately got. Drew, RuPaul and Faith are incredibly accomplished superstars whose talents encompass every area of entertainment. Along with James, The World’s Best will now be the gold standard of competition shows.”

Burnett also said: “James Corden is at the top of his game and there is no one better to host this ultimate international competition series. This groundbreaking series is like the Olympics of talent shows and needed the perfect talent combination.”
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