Category: Videos

Press/Video: Drew for ‘Glamour UK’ Magazine

In a refreshingly honest interview, Drew Barrymore opens up to GLAMOUR about feminism, ageing naturally and her amazing beauty brand, Flower Beauty.

Drew Barrymore, the woman who stole my heart aged seven, as I sat on my dad’s knee in the cinema watching E.T., walks into her hotel room and gives me a big hug. She’s wearing a green silk Zara kimono jacket and a vintage Mickey Mouse T-shirt. I am slightly taken aback by her normality. Seeing an icon in the flesh, one whom I’ve girl-crushed on since childhood, is surreal. She should, given her Hollywood pedigree, be giving Mariah a run for her money in the diva stakes.

But there are no demands, no entourage. And no sanitised, PRd-to-within-an-inch-of-their-lives soundbites. She’s in the UK to promote her beauty brand, Flower Beauty. In fact, five minutes in, and we’re talking heroin and plastic surgery.

“I have an extremely addictive personality,” says Drew, openly. “I’ve never done heroin,” she comments, referring to her misspent youth, “and I don’t want to get plastic surgery because I feel like they’re both very slippery slopes. I feel if I try either, I’m going to be dead really soon.”

It’s why she feels very strongly about ageing naturally. “Not messing with my face or chasing some unnatural beauty is a standard I live by. I have dark circles under my eyes. I was at my dermatologist’s recently who said to me, ‘Can I shoot some Juvederm up there? It will raise the skin and it won’t be so sunken, which is causing the darkness to look worse, because it’s lower than the natural light that is hitting it.’ And I went: ‘No, but I’m gonna go home and start highlighting under my eyes, so thank you for the tip!”

It’s this refreshing, no-BS approach that has led to her to becoming a genuine, modern role model, appealing to women of all ages. Often, when actresses say they don’t have plastic surgery, what they really mean is they don’t go ‘under the knife’ – but that excludes injectables. I look more closely at Drew’s face and I can assure you it’s as real as her attitude. Her under-eyes and forehead have the natural fine lines you’d expect of a 43-year-old mother of two. Everything moves and she is beautiful. It’s unusual for a Hollywood star of her status to be so, well, au natural.

“It shouldn’t be,” she says, shaking her head. “We’ve gone far too far with the whole thing, especially when people who are so young are doing it.” She’s always felt this way, more so now she’s a mother.
“I feel ageing is a privilege. It’s about how to do it gracefully, with humour, self-love and a respect for the process, and that’s always been really important to me. Then I started having girls and I thought, thank god these were my initial instincts. Now I can carry them out in an even more deep and profound way.”

Instead of surgery, she swears by a ‘Clear + Brilliant’ laser treatment with NYC-based dermatologist Dr Roy G. Geronemus.

“He’s the best,” she assures me. “[The treatment] just schluffs the barnacles of brown and sun damage off your face. It’s the greatest thing ever. It’s non-invasive and there’s no downtime. It’s like microdermabrasion laser, but it always makes me feel so much more attractive.”

If she sounds like the most balanced person you’ve ever met, by her own admission, it hasn’t always been that way. Born in Los Angeles into an acting dynasty on her father’s side, she was put to work in a dog food commercial aged 11 months. She was a film star by seven – pouring Baileys over her ice-cream – and her mother reportedly first took her clubbing to Studio 54 when she was nine. Sadly, around the same time, Drew developed a drink and drug habit.

Professionally, she was judged harshly, with no big roles coming her way. But she never gave up, rising from the ashes to become a successful, Golden Globe- and SAG-award-winning actress and producer, star of Never Been Kissed, 50 First Dates, The Wedding Singer, Scream, Charlie’s Angels Grey Gardens and more recently Netflix show, Santa Clarita Diet. On a personal level, motherhood seems to have given her a sense of belonging – she is a single mum to her two girls Olive, six and Frankie, four, from her third marriage to Will Kopelman, which ended in 2016.

Now, she has another string to her bow: beauty boss – in 2013 she launched her cruelty free cosmetics brand Flower Beauty, which is now available in the UK. It closes the gap between mass and prestige and everything is priced under £13. What inspired her to go down the ethical route?
“I was vegan and an animal-rights activist a lot of my life, so I think it’s just held over from that. I used to be a crazy fundamentalist and didn’t wear leather. So for my own brand, I had to be true to my ethics. People sometimes assume we’re a major botanical, organic company because we’re called Flower Beauty and I’m like, oh no – bring on the chemicals. I want good pigments and amazing products that perform.” Is there a product in her collection she swears by? “Our concealer wand is phenomenal,” she smiles.

In the wake of #MeToo, when activism and speaking out has become the norm, does she still identify herself as an activist? After all, she took her daughter Olive to the anti-Trump Women’s March in 2017.

“I was a bit scared of feminism when I was younger because of all the male bashing. And there are a lot of women’s movements now that I’m apprehensive about, because I don’t want to be viscerally angry at men. I love men. I like keeping both sides in mind. I avoid anything political, where I sense too much anger. It’s just not the way I find messaging to be truly empowering.”

So what hopes does she have for her daughters in the future? “The empowerment to know that girls and women are worthy without wanting to take down the male race…”

As we wrap up the interview, I can’t help but think Drew’s eldest daughter is now almost the same age as she was when I first set eyes on her in E.T. – and how she’s creating a happy, stable childhood for her daughters, so different from her own. If she could send a message to her angry, scared seven-year-old self now, what would it say?
“I would try to tell her how everything’s going to be OK ­– but she just won’t know it till she’s there anyway.”
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Press/Video: The Story Behind Scream’s 12-Minute, Still-Terrifying Opening Scare

Kevin Williamson was a struggling actor in his 20s when he decided to try his hand writing the sort of slasher films he grew up loving. By then, he’d watched Halloween and Friday the 13th so many times that he knew every twist of the camera and jump scare by heart. “I wanted to write a horror movie that I’d want to watch,” he said. “But how do you scare an audience when all the magic tricks have been exposed?”

The answer, as it turned out, was Scream, the self-aware, meta horror ’90s hit about a group of teenagers who have watched all the horror movies, and then, one by one, are murdered. More than 20 years later, Scream is still scary. And everything that makes it great is on display in its electric opening scene: a twisted game of horror trivia, a beautiful girl, a pair of gruesome murders, a telephone ringing in an isolated house at night.

For Vulture’s package on the 100 Scares That Shaped Horror, Williamson shared the story behind how he conceived of the film’s iconic opening scene.

I knew all these horror movies inside and out, and I kept thinking: How do you scare an audience that grew up on VHS, that’s watched these movies over and over again? So I thought, we comment on the rules and then subvert them a bit — or, sometimes, we follow them exactly, and then you never know what you’re going to get. When you put your star actress in the opening scene and kill her, you’re putting everyone off their game.

I wanted the Janet Leigh moment. I always felt that once you killed the star of the movie, all bets are off. When we first did the movie, Drew was attached to play Sidney Prescott, and then we were trying to find a bigger actress to play the opening part. At the time, Alicia Silverstone was huge, coming off of Clueless, but then Drew told us, “I really just want to play the opening scene. That’s my favorite part of the movie.” And that was great by us.

I wanted her to be the classic, ingénue teenage girl, with that innocent face, in a white sweater and blond hair. At the time, Drew had jet black hair, and she’d just dyed it, so we couldn’t dye it back to blond. She had to wear a wig. I remember Wes saying, “let’s just think of her as a Catholic school girl. She does everything right, and she’s a perfect little girl, and she’s about to be eviscerated, and that’s it.” And I was like, “okay, works for me!” I just wanted the audience to relate to her on some emotional level, and that’s why casting was so important. You meet her and two minutes later she’s in danger. We need an instant connection.

That’s what Drew brought to it. You instantly related to her and the fear dancing in her eyes as she starts to get nervous and uncomfortable, and she starts to realize this is going south. It’s a great performance. Her body language in the beginning is very swirly and rhythmic. She pulls a knife out and slides it back in to the butcher block. She spins around. And then the minute she gets scared, her shoulders go inward and everything changes. If you watch it again, just watch her body language as it transforms.

Drew was very adamant that she didn’t want to see the man playing the voice. We had him in a separate tent, and we had to keep him away from Drew’s vision. She just wanted to hear the voice and be scared by the voice. She didn’t want to attach a face to it. She didn’t want to get one word wrong. And I’m talking even about her screams and her breaths and her “No! No! No!” She was on the mark. I was blown away by her rhythm. I’m always happy to have actors ad-lib, because that can be some of your best stuff and Matthew Lillard was a genius at it. But she was so careful.

A big inspiration for me was the opening scene of When a Stranger Calls with Carol Kane. It was one of those relentless scenes with mood and atmosphere and a slow build. In my first pass of the scene, Casey Becker was actually babysitting. Once I’d written it, I realized it wasn’t necessary. Really, the scene was about Casey’s boyfriend, who was outside strapped to a chair. And it was about the game, and the premise, and the setup, and the conceit of the world we’d created. I wanted it to be just long enough that the audience thinks she might survive it. And the only way to do that was to let it go on just a tad longer than it should. An opening scene shouldn’t go on longer than ten minutes, and this one went on much longer than that.

Once I latched onto the game, I do remember I had written way too many questions. Eventually I narrowed it down, and focused in on the trick question [“Name the killer in Friday the 13th.”] I had much harder questions in the beginning, and the scene really went on forever.

From the page to the screen, we changed some things based on the house and the location. Like, how she got out of the house, and when she looked up at the window and saw that he was staring down at her. All of those moments were created on the spot because of the house. We wanted a house with windows everywhere. Wes was always big on shooting on location. He always wanted to see out the windows, so that the audience could see the danger, or not see the danger that was lurking out there. Prior to the shooting, I went with him to the house and we walked it, and I went and rewrote the action scenes based on his blocking. It was my first experience of realizing that what I saw in my head was never what it actually is. That was a big learning experience, of learning how to let things go. But this is the process. It’s a group effort. It was mostly, “oh wow, this is not what I envisioned in my head — this is better.”

It took them five nights to shoot it. It was my first movie, and I had no idea what I was doing. I was just standing there, asking constant questions. Like, “what’s that? That’s a crane!” I remember the producer looking at me at one point and saying, “you might want to stop asking questions. He’s not here for you. This isn’t a study session.” And Wes was like, “no it’s cool, it’s cool.” I found Wes to be the most calming presence on the set. He saved all his dark impulses for the work. He was just this quiet captain. He always had a great connection with the actors because he was so quiet and intimate with them.

Watching the scene come to life was very emotional. I called my mom and dad on the phone and let them hear Wes screaming “cut!” It was a big deal. It was the beginning of my career. And you just never know how it’s going to play out — it was such a question mark. How lucky was I that my first movie would be something like that? Scream was just everything and more to me. And it still is.
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Video: Drew Barrymore on SNL (November 2018)

Tina Fey, Candice Bergen and Drew Barrymore welcome Jonah Hill into the Five-Timers Club.

Press/Video: Watch Norm Macdonald sit down with Drew Barrymore, Michael Keaton, and more on new Netflix show

Norm Macdonald’s new Netflix talk show is finally set to make its debut and the streaming service has unveiled a profanity-filled first look at the series.

In the preview for Norm Macdonald Has a Show the comedian sits down with a long list of stars, including Drew Barrymore, David Letterman, Jane Fonda, David Spade, Chevy Chase, M. Night Shyamalan, Michael Keaton, and Lorne Michaels.

Along with his sidekick Adam Eget, the Saturday Night Live alum asks such probing questions as “Do you miss cocaine?” to Barrymore and “Have you been thinking about your mortality a lot lately?” to Letterman. In between talking strip clubs with Judge Judy and Chase quipping that he “f—ed” Bob Dylan, there are plenty of clumsy on-set mishaps to enjoy.

First announced in March, series is based on his podcast/web series Norm Macdonald Live and is set to debut on Sept. 14.
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Get back on the Santa Clarita Diet next month on Netflix

EW.com gives us the good news that Santa Clarita Diet will premiere season 2 next month!

Hungry for more, um, flesh? There’s not long to wait; Netflix has set the season 2 premiere date for Santa Clarita Diet for late March.

When the flesh-eating zombie horror-comedy returns March 23, we find Joel (Timothy Olyphant) and Sheila (Drew Barrymore) attempting to maintain a some kind of normalcy in their lives while hiding the fact that people are going missing in the Californian suburb as Sheila feeds her need for blood and guts and they search for a cure for the zombie virus.

The new season also adds some recurring new faces and a bunch of guest stars, including Joel McHale, Gerald McRaney, Zachary Knighton, and Maggie Lawson. McHale and Lawson step into the shoes of Chris and Christa, a successful, type-A married realtor couple who expose Joel and Sheila’s competitive streak. Castle and This Is Us star Gerald McRaney also joins the cast as Ed Thune, a retired army colonel Joel finds intimidating, while Zachary Knighton plays a laid-back Serbian Californian on a ruthless quest to uncover the truth about the undead. Check out EW’s first look at the Rolodex of guest stars here.

The first season of Santa Clarita Diet is available to stream on Netflix now before the second season drops on March 23.

Drew on Ellen

This week Drew did a guest appearance on Ellen to talk about her new season of Santa Clarita Diet … and a whole lot more!

Drew Barrymore Recreates Her Younger Self

The eternally youthful Drew Barrymore went back in time after she agreed to let Ellen dress her up in a fabulous outfit from when she was 7 years old.

Drew Barrymore Is Done with Dating Apps

According to an Australian tabloid, Ellen is helping Drew Barrymore find a girlfriend, but in reality, Drew isn’t going to Ellen for a potential mate, but a popular dating app.

Drew Barrymore Dishes on Her Secrets to Co-Parenting and Makeup-Free Beauty

Drew Barrymore was honored at the annual Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles Once Upon A Time Gala in Los Angeles on Saturday night, and ET’s Lauren Zima caught up with her on the red carpet, where she opened up about her love of Halloween and the challenges of co-parenting.

So how does Barrymore make it work as a newly single mom-of-two? “Plans,” she explains. “Constant plans. We, as a family, have three dates for this Halloween.”

Between all the planning and coordinating with her ex-husband Will Kopelman’s family — the couple’s divorce was finalized in August after four years of marriage — Barrymore says she feels honored for the continued love and acceptance from her children’s paternal grandmother. “[It] means the world to me,” she says.

Still, the 41-year-old actress and producer is looking forward to the hectic Halloween in front of her. “It’s like the best day ever,” she gushes. “It’s the only day that’s acceptable and not totally creepy to wear a mask, so God bless Halloween! I love it. I get to be an anonymous parent that night, so I’m into that!”

Speaking of dressing up, Barrymore looked stunning in a black, off-the-shoulder Elizabeth Kennedy New York dress, with her hair swept back in a loose braid.

But with the busy demands of motherhood and entrepreneurship — Barrymore has her own makeup line, Flower Beauty, as well as her own production company, Flower Films — the star says she saves getting made up for special occasions these days.

“I have a motto, ‘A smile is better than any lipstick you’re ever going to buy,'” she says. “So if I can be just me every day of my life and have the makeup moment feel special or like I’m carving something out of my time, or I’m making an effort to show someone in a meeting or a dinner that I’ve made the effort — it feels special. But every day is not like that.”

That explains some of the stellar makeup-free looks the How To Be Single producer has been posting to her Instagram lately!

Barrymore was honored at the Children’s Hospital gala with the Courage to Care award, given to those who champion children’s welfare-related causes. She posted a photo of her award to Instagram on Sunday, writing that the honor “will just make me work harder to earn it!”

But that wasn’t all! Barrymore also got to fangirl over fellow Children’s Hospital volunteer, Katy Perry, who performed at the gala.

“Oh yeah! And this happened!!!,” she wrote on Instagram. “@katyperry my fellow @childrensla representative tonight at the gala!!! #loveher #roar me and my daughters listen to her with such joy!”

Plus, the actress had a very special date for the gala: 13-year-old Madison Elizondo. Barrymore met Elizondo, who has been treated frequently at the hospital, last year, and the two formed a friendship. ET can exclusively reveal that Barrymore gave her pal the full red-carpet treatment Saturday night! Elizondo was styled by Barrymore’s personal stylist, and the actress’ team also did her nails and makeup.

Drew Barrymore’s Harper’z Bazaar Cover Shoot

A behind-the-scenes look our fiery cover shoot with the Drew Barrymore for the March 2016 issue of Harper’s Bazaar magazine.

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